Nov
08

Sending Email Attachments: When is Big too Big?

By

Lately I’ve been getting emails from people with
enormous attachments. This is poor form for a couple reasons.

1. If the attachment makes it through, you may have caused the
person receiving the email to exceed their allotted email space
which would make their other emails undeliverable. They won’t be
very happy with you if you cause that to happen.

2. Many servers are set to delete or “send to junk” large
attachments because it looks like a hacker attack on their
system. In this case your email never gets through.

3. Definitely don’t send a broadcast email or set up an
autoresponder with an attachment. You’ll get tons of complaints
and a bad delivery rate. Just send an email with a link in it to
where people can download the file if they want to.

Large files are much more common because of video and graphics.
So what should you do?

A. Check the size of your file before you attach it to an email.
If it’s anything bigger than a megabyte or two, don’t send it via
email unless the person receiving it gives you the go ahead.

Generally you can “right click” on a file and click on
“properties” to see the file size.

B. Learn to reduce the file size of your graphics for screen,
ebook or website use. I use a free service called
http://www.fotoflexer.com

C. Use a file transfer service. We have one online that you don’t
even have to register to use. Find it at
http://www.KickStartTransfers.com Upload your file to that
service and tell it the email address you want the file delivered
to. The recipient will get an email telling them they have a file
to download. This is a much more accepted procedure and will make
you look like you know what you’re doing.

Also, you get confirmation when they download the file.

Use the above tips to make sure you don’t look foolish or cause
trouble for people when you send emails.

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Categories : Email Strategies

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